Tingey's New & Second Hand Furniture

Opening of Tingey's store (1920)

Mrs Rosemary Marshall
Mrs Rosemary Marshall
Inside the store
Mrs Rosemary Marshall
Another view inside
Mrs Rosemary Marshall
The Chapel Store (The Chaple was in French Horn Lane)
Mrs Rosemary Marshall
The Counter
Mrs Rosemary Marshall
Rosemary Marshall

The pictures above were provided by Mrs Rosemary Marshall née Ewington. Rosemary’s father (Harry Ewington) was Manager at the store.

This page was added on 10/09/2012.

Comments about this page

  • I remember going into Tingey’s grocery shop & being mesmerised by the tills! I lived in Hatfield, first in Briars Lane & then Elm Drive. We went to Howe Dell School and then St Audrey’s in Traveller’s Lane.

    By Anne Love (07/03/2018)
  • I lived in Hatfield from 1956 (when I was born) until 1980. Tingeys also had a small grocery shop at the Cavendish shops in Bishops Rise. This was managed by Phillip Gloistein, we lived next door to him in Hazeldine Meadows. I am still in touch with his two son’s. None of us are local anymore. …anyone else from that time reading this?

    By Ray Pickett (11/10/2017)
  • Often used to go in this shop during the 1950’s and 1960’s with Mum and Dad. It’s just as I remember it.

    By Christine Newman (nee Skinner) (27/07/2017)
  • We lived in the Gun Inn accross from Tingey’s and watched the lamplighter come every evening to light the lamps along the path. My father, Robert William Canham was proprietor of the Gun where horse-drawn wagons brought supplies of beer each Monday morning from Benskins Brewery, We three children, Elizabeth, Judith and Peter all attended Newtown School.

    By The Rev. Dr. Elizabeth Canham (15/05/2017)
  • In 1938 E.T.Tingey and Son had bought a redundant Wesleyan Chapel in French Horn Lane which was used mainly as a store for second hand furniture. The history of the Chapel goes back to c1851 when it is reported to have 5 members of the Methodist Church when services were held in the old cow shed situated at the stable end of the Two Brewers Public House at the top of Church Street, now St Audrey’s residential home.

     By 1864 the congregation numbered 18 and the Moocow Chapel, as it was called, had been in use for forty years while a suitable site for a new chapel was sought. Eventually a site was purchased for £800. Memorial stones were laid on May 28 1889 by Mrs. Camp. The new chapel cost £1,200 and Mr. Camp, of Roe Green donated a considerable sum towards the cost.  The new chapel was opened on October 1889.

     The membership increased for fifty years up to 1938 when the congregation moved to a new chapel in Birchwood Avenue and Tingey and Son took over the old chapel.

    By Frank Cox (18/09/2012)

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